Courses

From FachschaftSprachwissenschaft
Revision as of 16:21, 18 June 2011 by Mzepf (Talk | contribs)

Jump to: navigation, search

This page lists obligatory and optional courses for students of General and/or Computational Linguistics at the Seminar für Sprachwissenschaft (SfS). Other courses of interest outside the SfS can be found on Course reviews.

Please note that the reviews on these courses are mainly subjective. The content of courses may vary from one lecturer to another or between different semesters. Also, this list is very likely not comprehensive.


Data Structures and Algorithms for Language Processing (Java 1)

Audience: ISCL B.A. majors 1st semester, ISCL B.A. minors 3rd semester, ISCL M.A. students who do not know Java

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Frank Richter, tutorial by Jochen Saile, homework graded by Anne Brock

Room: 2.26, the computer lab

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~fr/teaching/ws10-11/java/

Description: This is a programming course in Java for beginners. It introduces students to data types, variables, conditional statements and loops, before quickly focusing on object oriented programming, and finishing off with file input / output.

Literature: In the WS 2010/11, the first ten chapters of Java: An Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming, 5th Edition by Walter Savitch and Frank Carrano were covered. Many students found the book to be very helpful, although somewhat lengthy. Students who already know a programming language might not find much new information in it, however.

Effort: weekly homework, weekly lab sessions with extra assignments, two exams, presence during lectures required

Time: 2x2 hours + 4 hours lab session each week

Credits: 9 ECTS

How to prepare: Learn any programming language. If you do not know which one to start with, learn Java, as it is the language taught in this course. There are lots of free tutorials available online. But knowledge in anything that is a bit like programming will help, including MS Excel / OpenOffice formulae, HTML, or even cheats in computer games.

How to survive: Do work in groups! It is (almost) impossible to master this course on one's own without any prior knowledge in programming. Therefore, work together, share your ideas, explain to each other what you have understood and answer each others questions. If that doesn't help, contact the lecturer as soon as possible and ask them to explain things again.


Introduction to Computational Linguistics

Audience: ISCL B.A. majors 1st semester, ISCL B.A. minors 1st semester

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Adriane Boyd

Room: 0.02 (may change in future semesters)

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~adriane/teaching/ws2010/icl/

Description: The course provides a non-technical introduction into different areas in computational linguistics.

Literature: various, mainly Speech and language processing by Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin (2009)

Effort: one or two papers to read each week, occasional homework, two exams

Time: 2 hours per week

Credits: 3 ECTS

How to prepare: Be interested in computational linguistics, that's it. Absolutely no previous knowledge is required for this course.

How to survive: Make sure you pay close attention during class and read the papers.


Mathematics for linguists

Audience: ISCL B.A. majors 1st semester, ISCL B.A. minors 3rd semester (first half of the course), General Linguistics B.A. majors and minors (first half of the course)

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Gerhard Jäger and Jason Quinley, tutorials by Dankmar Enke and David Lahm

Room: 1.13 (may change in future semesters)

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~gjaeger/lehre/ws1011/mathe.shtml

Description: A basic introduction to logic: statement and predicate logic (including truth trees and natural deduction). The second half continues with set theory, relations, formal languages and different automata.

Literature: Partee, B. H., A. ter Meulen & R. E. Wall, Mathematical Methods in Linguistics, Kluwer, Dordrecht 1990. Hopcroft, J. E. and J. D. Ullman, Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation, Addison Wesley 1979. Many students used the slides as their primary resource, however.

Effort: weekly homework sheets, two exams (or one if you only need the first half)

Time: 2x2 hours per week

Credits: 6 ECTS for the whole course

How to prepare: All the topics covered in this course are more or less related to each other. Therefore, you can start with almost anything you like. If you never had set theory (Mengenlehre) at school, you might want to start learning about Venn diagrams. An interest in solving logic puzzles or murder mysteries could also be an advantage.

How to survive: Find a source that explains things the way you understand them best and stick to it. Never give up!


Introduction to General Linguistics

This module is composed of three courses. If you take this course for credit, you must attend all three lectures.

Audience: General Linguistics B.A. majors and minors 1st semester

Credits: 9 ECTS

Phonology and Phonetics 0

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Christian Ebert

Room: 0.02 (may change in future semesters)

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~cebert/teaching/10PhonPhon/

Description: Introduction to phonology and phonetics.

Effort: one exam

Time: 2 hours each week

How to prepare: No previous knowledge required.

How to survive: Study hard until you know everything by heart. That's it.

Syntax 0

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Sam Featherston

Room: 0.02 (may change in future semesters)

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~sam/teach/IntroGenLing/content.html

Description: This course is all about drawing trees to represent the syntactic structure of sentences.

Literature: Sam's script

Effort: one exam

Time: 4 hours each week (only takes place in the first half of the semester)

How to prepare: If you do not already know it, learn what parts of speech are.

How to survive: Draw trees. You need a lot of practice.

Semantics 0

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Gerhard Jäger

Room: 0.02 (may change in future semesters)

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~gjaeger/lehre/ws1011/semantics0.html

Description: The lecture starts with simple sense relations like synonymy, then focuses on different types of ambiguities. More than half of the time, however, is devoted to computing extensions and intensions of phrases and, eventually, sentences.

Literature: Thomas Ede Zimmermann and Wolfgang Sternefeld's Lecture notes in Semantics provides a thorough and understandable explanation of the topics covered in this lecture. See Prof. Sternefeld's website for a German version.

Effort: one exam

Time: 4 hours each week (only takes place in the second half of the semester)

How to prepare: Can you paraphrase the two meanings of sentences such as The man saw the boy with the binoculars? Also, take a course on logic and/or set theory.

How to survive: Don't let the complexity of set theory confuse you. Pay close attention to notational conventions.


Languages of the World

Audience: ISCL B.A. majors whose minor is General Linguistics, probably others (?), anyone who is interested

Semester described here: WS 2010/11

Lecturer: Gerhard Jäger

Room: 1.13 (may change in future semesters)

Course Website: http://www.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/~gjaeger/lehre/ws1011/languages_of_the_world.html

Description: What do all languages of the world have in common? And where do they differ in structure? Are all languages derived from one common ancestor language? Why does Inuktitut have such long words? And how can speakers of Dani describe the world with only two different color terms?

Literature: Baxter, William H. and Alexis Manaster Ramer. 2000. Beyond lumping and splitting: Probabilistic issues in historical linguistics. In Colin Renfrew, April McMahon, and Larry Trask, editors, Time Depth in Historical Linguistics. The McDonald Institute for Archeological Research, Cambridge, UK, pages 167--188. Whaley, L. J. (1997), Introduction to Typology. The Unity and Diversity of Language. Many students used the slides as their primary resource, however.

Effort: (almost) weekly homework that is not graded but highly recommeded, two exams

Time: 2 hours each week

Credits: 3 ECTS

How to prepare: Be interested in all kinds of exotic languages, their exotic linguistic properties and comparisons between them.

How to survive: Be interested. Then everything is easy.


Text Technology

Audience: ISCL B.A. majors 2nd semester, ISCL B.A. minors 2nd semester

Semester described here: SS 2011

Lecturer: Thorsten Trippel and Frank Richter

Room: 2.26, the computer lab

Course Website: https://moodle01.zdv.uni-tuebingen.de/course/view.php?id=515 (ZDV login required)

Description: Corpora are great in linguistics, but they become useless very soon if they are stored in the wrong format. This course shows how to store and manipulate linguistic data in a way that preserves them for future generations of linguists.

Literature: Lothar Lemnitzer, Heike Zinsmeister (2006): Korpuslinguistik. Eine Einführung.

Effort: a group project, one exam

Time: 2x2 hours per week

Credits: 6 ECTS

How to prepare: Do an online tutorial on HTML and CSS. Probably design your own website.

How to survive: Do lots of online tutorials on HTML, CSS, XML, (DTD,) XSD, XSLT and whatever things you don't understand.


Programming Course for Computational Linguistics I (Java 2)

Audience: ISCL B.A. majors 2nd semester, ISCL B.A. minors 4th semester, basic knowledge in Java required

Semester described here: SS 2011

Lecturer: Dale Gerdemann, lab sessions: Jochen Saile

Room: 2.26, the computer lab

Course Website: none

Description: Now that you know how to program, you have to learn how to program efficiently. Additionally, you will get to know important algorithms, especially ones for searching and sorting.

Literature: Algorithms by Sedgewick and Wayne

Effort: a programming project, weekly homework to be handed in at the end of each lab session

Time: 2x2 hours + 4 hours lab session per week

Credits: 12 ECTS

How to prepare: Make sure you know - and can apply - everything from Courses#Java_1. Be prepared to use entirely new classes, so get used to JavaDoc APIs.

How to survive: Again, do work in groups! First, figure out what exactly the assignment is. If this is not clear, ask the lecturer. Then, together with your group, write down in plain English what your program should do, step by step. Finally, everyone should translate these steps into code on their own.